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castieltherebel:

2srooky:

hobbitofthemotherfuckinshire:

All of us at one point have wanted to be a cat

everybody wants to be a cat. Cause a cat’s the only cat who knows where it’s at.

image

(via onlylolgifs)

Source: hobbitofthemotherfuckinshire
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Photo Set

shattterhearts:

chaoticpirate:

nivalvixen:

olimaru:

How r these people even breathing?

So much stupid. Cannot function on same planet. I must leave now.

this one killed me

Oh my god.

(via compadre-please-weep-for-me)

Source: best-of-memes
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lesmoules:

been catching up on Adventure Time ( and Sky Witch gave me feelings fingerscrossed!!they’resocutetogether)

(via burdge)

Source: lesmoules
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sapphiretemplo:

pag-asaharibon:

not-your-asian-fantasy:

Early Feminism in the PhilippinesThe Philippines has been noted as having one of the smallest gender disparities in the world. The gender gap has been closed in both health and education; the country has had two female presidents (Corazon Aquino from 1986-1992 and Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo from 2001-2010); and had its first woman Supreme Court justice (Cecilia Muñoz Palma in 1973) before the United States had one (Sandra Day O’Connor in 1981). These achievements reflect a long history of efforts by women to involve themselves equally in governance as well as in society.

I was expecting a little bit more from the post and was suprised a few of these Filipinas were left out:
Gabriela Silang a revolutionary – a representation of female bravery – who fought against Spanish colonialism in the 18th century. Silang was a contrast to the chaste and religiously devout image of the Filipino lady as portrayed by Jose Rizal through his Spanish-language novels, Noli Me Tangere and El Filibusterismo. 
Clemencia Lopez became the first Filipino to enter the White House and the first to testify before a U.S. Senate hearing as a representative of her subjugated people.
Sofia Reyes de Veyra an educator, social worker and first secretary and co-founder (with Mary E. Coleman) of Asociacion Feminista Filipina, the first women’s club in the Philippines. Its establishment in June 1905 marked the start of the Feminist Movement in the country. She also organized the Manila Women’s Club which later became the nucleus of the National Federation of Women’s Clubs. This federation was in the forefront of the campaign to give women the right to vote and other rights. The women of the Philippines won these rights in 1931.
Dr. Carol Pagaduan-Araullo an UP cum laude graduate, medical doctor, 2012 UP Distinguished Alumni awardee and Bagong Alyansang Makabayan (BAYAN) chairperson. While Dr. Araullo was UP Student Council vice chairman and an activist imprisoned for opposing martial law.
Unabridged version of Hercules, California Councilmember Myrna de Vera’s speech, delivered during the 2012 Filipina Women’s Network’s 100 Most Influential Filipina Women of the US
Philippines was ranked 3rd highest in Asia Pacific region for gender equality according to the Worldwide Index of Women’s Advancement report released by global financial firm MasterCard. Yet there’s still PH laws that are unfair to women.
Articles 
Filipinas who were first in PH history
I Am… Woman: Historic Filipinas
#SexTalk: Who is the Filipina of today?
Sampaguita Girl: The Pinay Activist Timeline
Women play key role in PH peace process
VIDEO: Where does the Filipino woman stand today?
Of race and gender clashes: Do women rise above labels?
'Breaking the Silence': The truth about abortion
Defending Filipino women from stereotypes
Importing, exporting stereotypes: How do global Pinays cope?
Barbara Jane Reyes: Virtual Blog Tour, Is Pinay Lit a Genre, and Tagging Others
Books
Denise Cruz’s Transpacific Femininities: The Making of the Modern Filipina
Mina Roces’ Women’s Movements and the Filipina 1986-2008
Melinda L. de Jesús’ Pinay Power: Peminist Critical Theory (reprinted this year)
chidtalk’s recommendations
A systems approach to improving maternal health in the Philippines by Dale Huntington, Eduardo Banzon, and Zenaida Dy Recidoro
Does Feminism Have to Address Race? by Latoya Peterson
Early Feminism in the Philippines by Athena Lydia Casambre and Steven Rood
Feminism and race in the Philippines
Feminism and the present image of Filipino women
Filipiniana: Philippine Women’s Studies
News From the Tropics: Is there Feminism in the Philippines?
Philippines: Feminists Converse on Social Movement Building
The changing role of women in Philippine society by Cicely Richard
The changing role of women in Philippine society by G. Fitzsimmon
The changing role of women in Philippine society by Zakiya Mahomed
Tumblr posts
chidtalk’s post on Filipin@s and Feminism
pinoy-culture’s 10 Kickass Pilipina Warriors in History That You Probably Never Heard Of


AGAIN

sapphiretemplo:

pag-asaharibon:

not-your-asian-fantasy:

Early Feminism in the Philippines

The Philippines has been noted as having one of the smallest gender disparities in the world. The gender gap has been closed in both health and education; the country has had two female presidents (Corazon Aquino from 1986-1992 and Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo from 2001-2010); and had its first woman Supreme Court justice (Cecilia Muñoz Palma in 1973) before the United States had one (Sandra Day O’Connor in 1981). These achievements reflect a long history of efforts by women to involve themselves equally in governance as well as in society.

I was expecting a little bit more from the post and was suprised a few of these Filipinas were left out:

  • Gabriela Silang a revolutionary – a representation of female bravery – who fought against Spanish colonialism in the 18th century. Silang was a contrast to the chaste and religiously devout image of the Filipino lady as portrayed by Jose Rizal through his Spanish-language novels, Noli Me Tangere and El Filibusterismo
  • Clemencia Lopez became the first Filipino to enter the White House and the first to testify before a U.S. Senate hearing as a representative of her subjugated people.
  • Sofia Reyes de Veyra an educator, social worker and first secretary and co-founder (with Mary E. Coleman) of Asociacion Feminista Filipinathe first women’s club in the Philippines. Its establishment in June 1905 marked the start of the Feminist Movement in the country. She also organized the Manila Women’s Club which later became the nucleus of the National Federation of Women’s Clubs. This federation was in the forefront of the campaign to give women the right to vote and other rights. The women of the Philippines won these rights in 1931.
  • Dr. Carol Pagaduan-Araullo an UP cum laude graduate, medical doctor, 2012 UP Distinguished Alumni awardee and Bagong Alyansang Makabayan (BAYAN) chairperson. While Dr. Araullo was UP Student Council vice chairman and an activist imprisoned for opposing martial law.

Unabridged version of Hercules, California Councilmember Myrna de Vera’s speech, delivered during the 2012 Filipina Women’s Network’s 100 Most Influential Filipina Women of the US

Philippines was ranked 3rd highest in Asia Pacific region for gender equality according to the Worldwide Index of Women’s Advancement report released by global financial firm MasterCard. Yet there’s still PH laws that are unfair to women.

Articles 

Books

chidtalk’s recommendations

Tumblr posts

AGAIN

(via ponyos)

Source: not-your-asian-fantasy
Photo Set

nohetero-superpotterlock:

good thing harry potter didnt choose slytherin

(via onlylolgifs)

Source: sebastianstoned
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problackgirl:

we’ve taught girls to romanticise nearly everything a boy does. when i was younger i thought it was cute that boys chased the girl even after she said no. i loved it when after a girl moved away from a kiss, the guy would pull her back and force it on. i thought a guy saying ‘i won’t take a no for an answer’ was passionate and romantic. we’re literally always teaching girls to romanticise abusive traits.

(via ponyos)

Source: problackgirl
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I love my skin!

(via ponyos)

Source: arthaemisia
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moniquill:

bloodhole:

did you know that the main reason we have a school lunch program is that in 1946 kids were too underfed to qualify for military service bc i just found that out and am horrified

nobody cares about children’s well being without an ulterior motive

“Conservatives want live babies so they can train them to be dead soldiers.” - George Carlin

(via ponyos)

Source: bloodhole
Photo Set

jedavu:

These Veiled Figures of Bronze and Marble by Kevin Francis Gray Seem to Drip with Fabric

Irish sculptor Kevin Francis Gray works primarily with bronze and marble to create idealized figures draped with fabric in the style of Neoclassical or Baroque figurative sculptures. Though, unlike gods or royalty that one might expect to see rendered in such incredible detail, Gray instead creates anonymous depictions of regular individuals he encounters near his studio in London, often people struggling with addiction or other difficult, real-world issues.

Source: jedavu
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jedavu:

Photos taken by Felix Odell

Source: jedavu
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jedavu:

Stunning illustrations by BRÄO

Source: jedavu
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galacticdad:

housing should be a basic a human right.

people shouldn’t have to “earn” a roof over their heads so that they don’t die in the streets.

(via ponyos)

Photo Set

jedavu:

21-Year-Old Photographer’s Conceptual Portraits Explore Worlds of Fantasy

Ventura County, California-based photographer Christopher J. Rivera explores extraordinary worlds of fantasy in his spectacular conceptual photography.

Source: jedavu
Photo Set

tw-koreanhistory:

Gone In 41 Seconds — Police Quick to Kill Korean Artist

Feb 24, 2008

LA HABRA, Calif. — On the afternoon of December 31, 2007, two police officers encountered Michael Cho in the parking lot of a liquor store in La Habra, a small, generally quiet city in Orange County, California. It didn’t take long for the meeting to go bad. After less than a minute the officers unleashed a barrage of bullets on the 25-year-old artist, ending his life - and setting off an ongoing cascade of protests across Southern California’s Korean American community.

Computerized police logs obtained by New America Media suggest the officers quickly turned to deadly force when they confronted Cho, whom they suspected of vandalism. According to the Computer Automated Transcript documenting the incident, at 2:04 p.m. the cops contacted their dispatcher to say they’d located Cho. “Out with the subject near the liquor store,” the transcript reads. Just 41 seconds later they radioed dispatch again, this time saying they’d shot the suspect and now needed paramedics to attend to him. “Shot fired, Suspect down, Medics requested,” reads the transcript. In the aftermath of the killing, Cho’s family has publicly condemned the department, saying the officers rushed to shoot Cho, rather than using less lethal tools like pepper spray or Taser stun guns to subdue him.

“The police killed my son like a dog,” Cho’s mother, Honglan Cho, recently told the La Habra City Council. According to Shelly Lynn Kaufman, an attorney for the Cho family, the fusillade of bullets left ten holes in his body.

Read More: http://news.newamericamedia.org/news/view_article.html?article_id=ad58d8b8031a47854d3676200f5c5be5 

(via ponyos)

Source: news.newamericamedia.org